There is a lot more to Interior Design than first meets the eye

Interior design is a complicated profession. It is sometimes referred to as interior architecture and often confused with interior decorating. It involves the design, organisation and planning of an interior structure rather than just refinishing and furnishing existing interior spaces. It involves managing a business, hopefully meeting the desires of the client and delivering to them an interior environment that is both functional and aesthetically pleasing. There is a lot more to interior design than first meets the eye.

The further you go back in history, it can be seen how interior design has blended with artistic societies such as during the Italian Renaissance. It has been shaped by numerous styles, movements, social developments and technological revolutions. It has crossed emotional boundaries, traveled across continents and has publicly revealed much of the lifestyles of societies and their artistic cultures in any marked period in time.

There are different types of interior design. Residential interior design involves dealing with home owners normally on an available budget. Some interior designers specialize in working on bathrooms, kitchens, living areas or even bedrooms. Others work in the larger and lucrative commercial interior design market. In this marketplace, interior designers are spoiled for choice and may select the retail industry, the hospitality business, the commercial building sector or specialize in related business as diverse as creating exhibits for art galleries and trade shows.

Interior Design is an exciting and rapidly growing field and it seems that interest in interior design as a particular career is increasing in popularity. Interior designers are licensed design professionals qualified by education, work experience and time. In the 1960s and 70s independent organizations were established to assess qualifications for interior designers and interior design programs. There are now many dedicated individuals in organizations such as CIDA and NCIDQ who presently work diligently to increase public awareness of interior design while developing the profession to where it is today.

There are interior design courses in universities, colleges and even online and an accreditation process that certifies a program will teach the principles necessary to ensure that the students acquire the knowledge, skills and experience to be successful in their future careers. All of this is seen as beneficial to the consumer who can be virtually assured of being led through the design process by someone who is not only creative and educated but also competently trained.

Examine the basic family home. Basically it is a cluster of interconnected rooms each with a primary function such as eating, entertaining, sleeping, washing and possibly even working. The conscious aim of interior design is to balance the owner’s needs with the spaces available. It is rarely straightforward. There are so many external forces that influence the decision making process. The key to interior design is knowing how to make sense out of the relationship between the owner, the home, the family and their lifestyle.

What is the difference between a conservatory and a Loggia

To provide a fair comparison between conservatories and Loggia Conservatories, it is worth looking at what defines each type of extension. /p>

A conservatory is best defined as a property extension with glass walls and roof, available in many different styles and glazing options and usually supported by dwarf walls. It was originally used to grow and protect citrus fruit trees during the winter months in the 16th century and was gradually developed over the proceeding centuries from a greenhouse to the modern variety we know today.

A loggia on the other hand is a property extension with glass walls and a glass roof, occasionally supported on dwarf walls, but with specially designed pillars set at regular intervals around the structure that provide a greater degree of structural integrity, greater thermal efficiency and a more aesthetically pleasing overall finish, both inside and outside the structure. In fact, the name “Loggia” is derived from a roofed gallery or recessed room open at one side and supported by ornate columns that was developed by Filippo Bruneschi during the Italian Renaissance period.

So the key difference between the two is the use of specially engineered columns that replace the need for awkward to build brick piers, greatly reducing build times, and are far more thermally efficient than using standard UPVC frames. These pillars even make the Loggia up to four times stiffer than a regular conservatory, which greatly reduces the “racking” effect of wind that could lead to cracking and other signs of distress.

Add to this the ease of internal plastering and you gain the solid, more luxurious feeling of a true extension with the low cost implications, permitted development rights removing the need for planning applications and all the extra natural light associated with modern conservatories. In fact, the Loggia even removes the need for building regulations, so the build itself can occur much faster without have to wait for approval from local authorities.