World’s Richest Real Estate Moguls

No matter what profession you are in, you will be impacted by real estate in some form or another. Whether you own, rent or sub-let, your life is impacted by real estate and the professionals or individuals that sell, manage or own it.

With that in mind, it would make sense that you just might be interested in people who have made it big in real estate. There are a select few in the entire world who have made their tremendous mark on the real estate landscape. Although, there were many struggles along the way, they arrived at that coveted spot of being a famous real estate tycoon.

Sarah Beeny is a developer and a host of Property Ladder, a British television program in the U.K. Beeny is a die-hard optimist and proponent for incorporating energy efficiency into building or remodeling.

Tim Blixseth is an American real estate mogul and billionaire businessman. He made a promise early on in his investment life to only collect assets, not liabilities, for the remainder of his life. He says he’s stuck to that promise.

Donald Bren, according to Forbes.com, is the wealthiest real estate tycoon on the planet with a $12 billion net worth. He currently owns hundreds of office buildings, along with 90 apartment complexes.

Conrad Hilton is the founder of Hilton Hotels. Hilton was known as a tremendous philanthropist who believed charity was a basic requirement for humanity.

Stanley Ho is one of the richest people in Asia. He’s a Macau and Hong Kong billionaire and casino mogul.

Lee Shau Kee is recently most famous for losing around $8 billion in net worth just in the past two years. Even with the huge losses, Kee continues to be noted as a real estate magnate as owner for Henderson Land Development. China’s greater region still considers Kee as one of the area’s richest people.

Ray Kroc is a entrepreneur who founded the McDonald’s Corporation franchise. Kroc purchased all rights to the McDonald’s name from the founding brothers Richard and Maurice McDonald. He took the franchise internationally to Japan and Germany in 1971.

Akira Mori is a famous Japanese real estate tycoon and billionaire. He’s one of the richest men in the world. President and CEO of Mori Trust, his family’s company owns real estate and hotels in Tokyo and all over Japan.

Minoru Mori is also a famous Japanese tycoon and billionaire. He and his brother Akira are sons to Taikichiro Mori.

Donald Trump is a famous television celebrity and billionaire real estate developer. Although his investments fluctuate with the waves of the sea, he always seems to come out on top.

Steve Wynn is a well-known Las Vegas casino and resort developer who developed some of the most opulent casinos and resorts in the City of Las Vegas.

Sam Zell’s net worth exceeds $6 billion. He is ranked 68th on Forbes’ list of richest Americans. He co-founded Equity Group Investments LLC that launched Equity Residential and Equity Office Properties.

Japanese Style Window Treatments

Going for that Japanese or Asian dcor? Read on for suggestions on the right window treatments for your home.

I have always been fascinated by Japanese culture and style and decided to put together the following suggestions.

Today’s decorating trends are all about globalization. As different cultures discover each other, they also appropriate traditional and modern elements of local interior design. Japanese influences were one the first to find their way into the multi-cultural design repertoire, and it’s easy to see why. Japanese culture is famous for its clean lines and use of natural textures, from bamboo to thin rice paper.

Bamboo wood blinds, which are also called woven wood shades, are a subtle and simple way to start off. Not only are they aesthetically pleasing and easy to use, they also offer high levels of light control and privacy. Another popular wood for Japanese window treatments is tatami, which is a thick woven read with a warm, natural texture. Both of these wood blinds can be stained to compliment an interior color scheme. Depending how far you want to take your theme, you can also look into sliding paper screen for your Japanese window treatments. These are a striking solution for covering unusually sized plate glass picture windows. Also known as shoji screens, these sliding screens offer a pleasant degree of light diffusion but do not provide complete blackout capabilities.

Though curtains are not inherently Japanese, many designers look to Japan’s traditional textile prints for inspiration. These prints, often found on kimonos and other clothing, can include everything from geometric designs to fanciful scenes of carp or eagles. These fabrics are usually employed as short hanging curtains, and can also be fashioned into caf curtains that subtly mimic the traditional hanging noren curtains found at the entrance to Japanese restaurants.

Another Japanese-style window treatment are panel track blinds, also know as sliding panels. Though not specifically Asian, panel tracks can lend to this kind of dcor readily. These window treatments are like oversized fabric vertical blinds and come in numerous colors, fabrics and textures. Panel tracks can also be used as a room divider, mimicking the Japanese sliding paper panels.

Last but not least are roman shades. Though, again, not specifically Asian or Japanese per se, the right fabric and texture choice could lend itself well to this kind of dcor. In my opinion, the best type of roman shade for this application would be the flat-style, not the hobbled or folded roman shades. Romans come in bamboo weaves, grasses and wood planks that would match well with the Japanese style of decorating.

A quick word of warning from personal experience – I have seen a few homes that have been decorated well in this style. And, kudos to those who have the vision, passion and artistic sense to pull it of; it is a bold choice, for sure. I have also, unfortunately, seen examples that did not integrate well or were taken too far. So, if you are interested in this motif, consider integrating subtle elements one step at a time and make sure you dont have clashing decorative motifs.